An introduction to regulating the illegal trade in wildlife: a case study on the illicit trade in rhinoceros horn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The illicit trade in wildlife is a multibillion dollar global criminal enterprise that
capitalises on drivers such as poverty, corruption, poor public education and ineffective regulation at great cost to both human and non-human life. Despite the remarkable value of goods traded and myriad of consequences, green criminologists such as Wyatt have lamented that the problem ‘remainson the fringes of both academia and policy.’

The purpose of this article is to set out the problem of the illegal trade in wildlife
in the context of recent technological and scientific development. In doing so, it will demonstrate that it has, in fact, risen to prominence as an issue of global concern, now framed as one of transnational crime. It will map out the nature and extent of the trade in rhinoceros horn, as a representative case commodity, before discussing contemporary issues that may inform future regulatory action
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-140
Number of pages18
JournalAustralian Journal of Environmental Law
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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