An Investigation of factors that influence help-seeking for hearing impairment in older adults

Carly Meyer, Louise Hickson, Karen Lovelock, Michelle Lampert, Asad Khan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    81 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To examine the influence of audiological and non-audiological factors on help-seeking for hearing impairment (HI) in older adults. Design: A retrospective research design was employed. Participants completed 14 measures, after which two multivariate, multinomial logistic regression models were fitted to the data to determine which factors were associated with consultation for HI and hearing aid uptake. Study sample: Three-hundred-and-seven individuals who were 60 years or older and who presented with a unilateral or bilateral HI participated in the study. Non-hearing aid owners were assigned to a non-consulter group (n = 55) or a consulter group (n = 92); hearing aid owners were assigned to an unsuccessful hearing aid owner group (n = 75) or a successful hearing aid owner group (n = 85). Results: A similar combination of factors was associated with the decisions to consult a health professional about HI and/or to adopt hearing aids. The most important factors related to attitudinal beliefs (e.g. perceived benefits of hearing aids) and external cues to action (e.g. support from significant others). Greater HI also influenced consultation and adoption of hearing aids. Conclusions: Findings highlight the importance of non-audiological factors in hearing rehabilitation to improve consultation for HI and hearing aid adoption.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)S3-S17
    Number of pages15
    JournalInternational Journal of Audiology
    Volume53
    Issue numberS1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

    Keywords

    • Health belief model
    • Hearing aids
    • Hearing impairment
    • Help-seeking
    • Older adults

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