An investigation of grapheme parsing and grapheme-phoneme knowledge in two children with dyslexia

Linda Larsen*, Saskia Kohnen, Genevieve McArthur, Lyndsey Nickels

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between children’s knowledge of letter-sound rules (“grapheme-phoneme knowledge”) and their ability to identify separate graphemes (e.g., SH, OI) that comprise words (“grapheme parsing”). We used a single-case study approach with children with phonological dyslexia who were able to read words accurately via whole-word processes (“lexical reading”), but were not able to read using grapheme-phoneme knowledge (“non-lexical reading”). These children were able to correctly parse some graphemes without grapheme-phoneme knowledge for these graphemes. However, they were unable to correctly parse some graphemes for which they had grapheme-phoneme knowledge. This dissociation suggests that children may acquire grapheme-phoneme knowledge and phoneme parsing independently. We discuss the implications of these findings for cognitive models of word reading.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)991–1015
    Number of pages25
    JournalReading and Writing
    Volume31
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018

    Keywords

    • non-lexical reading
    • grapheme-phoneme knowledge
    • grapheme parsing
    • phoneme blending
    • case-study

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