An on-line survey of university students with autism spectrum disorder in Australia and New Zealand: characteristics, support satisfaction, and advocacy

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Abstract

An on-line survey of 102 (51 females; undergraduate and graduate) university students with ASD across Australia and New Zealand examined student characteristics and satisfaction with academic and non-academic supports. A broad range of disciplines were studied, and the participants’ reported strengths included a passion for learning, strong technology skills, and creative thoughts. The participants’ greatest concerns were academic requirements and mental health, including high rates of self-harm and suicidal ideation. Despite support satisfaction ratings being high, support usage was low, possibly indicating a mismatch of supports and needs, lack of awareness of available supports, and/or poor advocacy skills.

LanguageEnglish
Pages440–454
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume50
Issue number2
Early online date28 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

Fingerprint

New Zealand
Students
Suicidal Ideation
Mental Health
Learning
Technology
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • autism spectrum disorder
  • university students
  • educational supports and services
  • on-line survey
  • advocacy

Cite this

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abstract = "An on-line survey of 102 (51 females; undergraduate and graduate) university students with ASD across Australia and New Zealand examined student characteristics and satisfaction with academic and non-academic supports. A broad range of disciplines were studied, and the participants’ reported strengths included a passion for learning, strong technology skills, and creative thoughts. The participants’ greatest concerns were academic requirements and mental health, including high rates of self-harm and suicidal ideation. Despite support satisfaction ratings being high, support usage was low, possibly indicating a mismatch of supports and needs, lack of awareness of available supports, and/or poor advocacy skills.",
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