Analysis of Coastal Middens in South-Eastern Australia: selectivity of angling and other fishing techniques related to Holocene deposits

Jennifer F. Owen*, John R. Merrick

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Several findings relating technology to size and species of fishes captured by coastal communities to south-eastern Australia, during the period 7000-270 BP, are questioned by recent studies. Angling, spearing, trapping and netting techniques are discussed with respect to selectivity, harvesting pressure and differential habitat exploitation. The possibility of a relationship between narrowest mouth aperture in snapper (Pagrus auratus) and minimal hook measurements is investigated. Comparisons, based on current fishing practice, indicate that recommended hook width is almost always smaller than minimum mouth width (posterior inter-dentary distance, PIDD)-usually much smaller; however, predicting the sizes of snapper that can be captured by a particular hook is not possible, using the parameters analysed to date.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)11-16
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Archaeological Science
    Volume21
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 1994

    Keywords

    • Technology, Coastal Middens, Holocene Remains, Angling, Spearing, Netting, Selectivity, South-Eastern Australia, Hook Width, Mouth Width

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