Animals, humans, angels and god: animal symbolism in the historiography of the 'Animal Apocalypse' of 1 Enoch

Lydia Gore-Jones*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The 'Animal Apocalypse' in the Ethiopic Book of Enoch (1 Enoch) presents a fascinating rendition of human history, and Israelite history in particular, entirely in an extended metaphor of animals. This article argues that the author's animal symbols are systematically applied, based on his ethical understanding of the Law regarding clean and unclean animals. Under its symbolic imagery the 'Animal Apocalypse' offers an alternative view on human history which combines both the earthly and the cosmic realms. The animal symbolism reveals the author's worldview and carries a depth of meaning which otherwise would be lost in a story told in a literal sense.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-287
Number of pages20
JournalJournal for the Study of the Pseudepigrapha
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2015

Keywords

  • Apocalyptic literature
  • Second Temple Judaism
  • Book of Dreams
  • kosher mentality
  • animal metaphor

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