Antibiotic allergy

immunochemical and clinical considerations

Brian A. Baldo*, Zhenjun Zhao, Nghia H. Pham

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antibiotics are among the most widely and heavily prescribed drugs, but despite this, allergic reactions to most groups of antibiotics are relatively uncommon-especially when compared with the number and frequency of type 1 hypersensitivity responses to the beta-lactams (ie, penicillins, cephalosporins, and, to a lesser extent, carbopenems). Still, there remains a steady flow of reports of allergic reactions to some topically used antibiotics (eg, rifamycin SV and bacitracin). Moreover, aminoglycosides (eg, neomycin and gramicidin) may be implicated more often than previously suspected. Despite advances in our understanding of the structural basis of the allergenicity of beta-lactam antibiotics, the insights have not readily transferred into routine use to improve diagnoses of reactions to individual penicillins and cephalosporins. This remains a challenge in drug allergy, as does the need for further chemical, immunologic, and clinical research on cephalosporin breakdown products and the so-called multiple antibiotic allergy syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-55
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Allergy and Asthma Reports
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • IGE-MEDIATED HYPERSENSITIVITY
  • BETA-LACTAM ANTIBIOTICS
  • PENICILLIN ALLERGY
  • RIFAMYCIN SV
  • INDUCED ANAPHYLAXIS
  • ENZYMIC HYDROLYSIS
  • MINOR DETERMINANTS
  • CROSS-REACTIVITY
  • CEPHALOSPORINS
  • ANTIBODIES

Cite this