Ants, apples and the ABCs: The use of commercial phonics programmes in prior-to-school children's services

Stacey Campbell, Jane Torr, Kathy Cologon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Commercial phonics programmes (e.g. Jolly Phonics and Letterland) are becoming widely used in the early years of school. These programmes claim to use a systematic explicit approach, considered as the preferred method of phonics instruction for teaching alphabetic code-breaking skills in Australia and the UK in the first years of school (Department of Education, Science and Training, 2005; Rose, 2006). However, little is known about the extent to which they are being used in prior-to-school settings, and the reasons behind decisions to use them. This study surveyed 283 early childhood staff in Sydney, Australia and found that commercial phonics programmes were being used in 36% of the early childhood settings surveyed. Staff with early childhood university qualifications and staff working in not-for-profit service types were less likely to use a commercial phonics programme than staff without university qualifications and staff working in for-profit services. Staff with less than 10 years' experience were also more likely to use a commercial phonics programme. The rationale behind decisions determining whether or not staff used the programmes ranged from pragmatic reasons, such as parent pressure or higher management decisions, to pedagogical reasons, such as teacher beliefs about how children learn to read and write. The practices staff engage in to teach phonics are explored.

LanguageEnglish
Pages367-388
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Early Childhood Literacy
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

schoolchild
staff
childhood
qualification
profit
school
university
management decision
pragmatics
parents
instruction
Teaching
teacher
science
education
experience

Cite this

@article{c9763f25dcc14a188a78c18a64fef5b5,
title = "Ants, apples and the ABCs: The use of commercial phonics programmes in prior-to-school children's services",
abstract = "Commercial phonics programmes (e.g. Jolly Phonics and Letterland) are becoming widely used in the early years of school. These programmes claim to use a systematic explicit approach, considered as the preferred method of phonics instruction for teaching alphabetic code-breaking skills in Australia and the UK in the first years of school (Department of Education, Science and Training, 2005; Rose, 2006). However, little is known about the extent to which they are being used in prior-to-school settings, and the reasons behind decisions to use them. This study surveyed 283 early childhood staff in Sydney, Australia and found that commercial phonics programmes were being used in 36{\%} of the early childhood settings surveyed. Staff with early childhood university qualifications and staff working in not-for-profit service types were less likely to use a commercial phonics programme than staff without university qualifications and staff working in for-profit services. Staff with less than 10 years' experience were also more likely to use a commercial phonics programme. The rationale behind decisions determining whether or not staff used the programmes ranged from pragmatic reasons, such as parent pressure or higher management decisions, to pedagogical reasons, such as teacher beliefs about how children learn to read and write. The practices staff engage in to teach phonics are explored.",
author = "Stacey Campbell and Jane Torr and Kathy Cologon",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1177/1468798411417377",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "367--388",
journal = "Journal of Early Childhood Literacy",
issn = "1468-7984",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "4",

}

Ants, apples and the ABCs : The use of commercial phonics programmes in prior-to-school children's services. / Campbell, Stacey; Torr, Jane; Cologon, Kathy.

In: Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, Vol. 12, No. 4, 12.2012, p. 367-388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ants, apples and the ABCs

T2 - Journal of Early Childhood Literacy

AU - Campbell,Stacey

AU - Torr,Jane

AU - Cologon,Kathy

PY - 2012/12

Y1 - 2012/12

N2 - Commercial phonics programmes (e.g. Jolly Phonics and Letterland) are becoming widely used in the early years of school. These programmes claim to use a systematic explicit approach, considered as the preferred method of phonics instruction for teaching alphabetic code-breaking skills in Australia and the UK in the first years of school (Department of Education, Science and Training, 2005; Rose, 2006). However, little is known about the extent to which they are being used in prior-to-school settings, and the reasons behind decisions to use them. This study surveyed 283 early childhood staff in Sydney, Australia and found that commercial phonics programmes were being used in 36% of the early childhood settings surveyed. Staff with early childhood university qualifications and staff working in not-for-profit service types were less likely to use a commercial phonics programme than staff without university qualifications and staff working in for-profit services. Staff with less than 10 years' experience were also more likely to use a commercial phonics programme. The rationale behind decisions determining whether or not staff used the programmes ranged from pragmatic reasons, such as parent pressure or higher management decisions, to pedagogical reasons, such as teacher beliefs about how children learn to read and write. The practices staff engage in to teach phonics are explored.

AB - Commercial phonics programmes (e.g. Jolly Phonics and Letterland) are becoming widely used in the early years of school. These programmes claim to use a systematic explicit approach, considered as the preferred method of phonics instruction for teaching alphabetic code-breaking skills in Australia and the UK in the first years of school (Department of Education, Science and Training, 2005; Rose, 2006). However, little is known about the extent to which they are being used in prior-to-school settings, and the reasons behind decisions to use them. This study surveyed 283 early childhood staff in Sydney, Australia and found that commercial phonics programmes were being used in 36% of the early childhood settings surveyed. Staff with early childhood university qualifications and staff working in not-for-profit service types were less likely to use a commercial phonics programme than staff without university qualifications and staff working in for-profit services. Staff with less than 10 years' experience were also more likely to use a commercial phonics programme. The rationale behind decisions determining whether or not staff used the programmes ranged from pragmatic reasons, such as parent pressure or higher management decisions, to pedagogical reasons, such as teacher beliefs about how children learn to read and write. The practices staff engage in to teach phonics are explored.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84870044024&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1468798411417377

DO - 10.1177/1468798411417377

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 367

EP - 388

JO - Journal of Early Childhood Literacy

JF - Journal of Early Childhood Literacy

SN - 1468-7984

IS - 4

ER -