Anxiety and niceness

drawing disability into the art and design curriculum through a live brief

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This article considers the way that affect shaped the unfolding of a curriculum initiative which aimed to expose undergraduate art and design students to the insights of critical disability studies. This initiative, funded by the Big Lottery and managed by disability charity Scope, asked students in art, design and multimedia programmes in four UK higher education institutions to engage with a live brief: to develop inclusive illustrated children's books and digital media. By focusing on the affective dimensions to this project and especially what Sianne Ngai refers to as the 'minor emotions' - not fear or passion or hatred, but, for example, anxiety - this article traces the way such feelings and associated 'taste concepts' influenced the engagements, disengagements and judgements of students, staff and the project's management.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDisability matters
Subtitle of host publicationpedagogy, media and affect
EditorsAnna Hickey-Moody, Vicki Crowley
Place of PublicationNew York : London
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor and Francis Group
Pages123-137
Number of pages15
ISBN (Print)9780415693509
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Bibliographical note

Originally published in: Discourse : studies in the cultural politics of education, Vol. 31, Issue 4 (2010), p.527-541.

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    Matthews, N. (2012). Anxiety and niceness: drawing disability into the art and design curriculum through a live brief. In A. Hickey-Moody, & V. Crowley (Eds.), Disability matters: pedagogy, media and affect (pp. 123-137). New York : London: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group.