Application of the restite model to the Deddick Granodiorite and its enclaves-A reinterpretation of the observations and data of Maas et al. (1997)

Allan J R White, Bruce W. Chappell*, Doone Wyborn

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    123 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Mafic S-type granites of the Lachlan Fold Belt always contain a distinctive suite of enclaves, dominated by schists and gneisses of high metamorphic grade, generally with lesser numbers of microgranular enclaves. Maas et al. (1997, Journal of Petrology 38, 815 841) recently described enclaves from the S-type Deddick Granodiorite. They concluded that the metasedimentary enclaves could be either source lithologies or accidental xenoliths, and that the most common microgranular enclaves formed as globules of hybrid magma that mingled with the host magma. All features of the metasedimentary enclaves are consistent with an origin as lithic restite fragments from the source, and their ubiquity in the mafic S-type granites and their rarity in both felsic varieties and in I-type granites conform with such an origin. The argument that these enclaves are not in chemical equilibrium with the host granite because they do not complement its composition is not valid, as they represent less fertile parts of the source that did not melt to the point of disaggregation. Unaltered cores of microgranular enclaves in the S-type granites have compositions that do not match those of any known igneous rock and an origin by metamorphism of a calcareous sediment is probable. Partial melting during that metamorphism accounts for the pseudo-igneous textures seen in these enclaves.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)413-421
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Petrology
    Volume40
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 1999

    Keywords

    • Enclave
    • Lachlan Fold Belt
    • Restite
    • S-type granite

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