Are male teachers headed for extinction? The 50-year decline of male teachers in Australia

Kevin F. McGrath, Penny Van Bergen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Whilst an international shortage of male teachers has received much research attention, to date, no study has tracked the trajectory of male teachers in any country. Drawing on annual workplace data, we calculated the proportion of male teachers in Australia from 1965 to 2016. We separate the data for Government and non-Government (Independent and Catholic) schools, and for primary and secondary schools. Findings indicate a strong decline in male representation in the Government sector. A similar rate of decline is observed in both primary and secondary schools. Of significance to educators, policy makers, and the public - no current Australian workforce diversity policies aim to redress this decline. This strong decline is not matched in the Catholic sector, however.

LanguageEnglish
Pages159-167
Number of pages9
JournalEconomics of Education Review
Volume60
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

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primary school
secondary school
teacher
shortage
workplace
educator
school
Extinction
Government
Secondary school
Primary school
Shortage
Work place
Trajectory
Proportion
Workforce diversity
Politicians

Cite this

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Are male teachers headed for extinction? The 50-year decline of male teachers in Australia. / McGrath, Kevin F.; Van Bergen, Penny.

In: Economics of Education Review, Vol. 60, 10.2017, p. 159-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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