Are micro enemas administered with a squeeze tube and a 5 cm-long nozzle as good or better than micro enemas administered with a 10 cm-long catheter attached to a syringe in people with a recent spinal cord injury? A non-inferiority, crossover randomised controlled trial

Louise C. Kelly, Joanne V. Glinsky, Lianne M. Nier, Gillian Garrett, Lisa A. Harvey*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Study design: Double blind, non-inferiority crossover randomised controlled trial. Objectives: To determine if micro enemas administered with a squeeze-tube and a 5 cm-long nozzle (squeeze-tube method) are as good or better than micro enemas administered with a 10 cm-long catheter attached to a syringe (catheter method) in people with a recent spinal cord injury. Setting: Two inpatient spinal cord injury units located in Sydney, Australia. Methods: Twenty people admitted to hospital with recent spinal cord injury were randomly assigned to two treatment sequences; 4 weeks of micro enemas delivered by the squeeze-tube method followed by 4 weeks of micro enemas delivered by the catheter method, or vice versa. Each treatment sequence was 8 weeks with a crossover at the end of week 4. The primary outcome was time to complete bowel care. Secondary outcomes reflected faecal incontinence, quality of life, perception of treatment effectiveness and participant reported time to complete bowel care. The primary and secondary outcomes were measured by blinded assessors in week 4 and week 8. A non-inferiority margin of 10 min for time to complete bowel care was set a priori. Results: The mean between group difference (95% confidence interval) for the time to complete bowel care was −0.5 min (−2.8 to 1.8), where a negative value favours the catheter method. Results were similar for all secondary outcomes. Conclusions: Micro enemas delivered by the squeeze-tube method are as good or better than micro enemas delivered by the catheter method in people with a recent spinal cord injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1136-1143
Number of pages8
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume60
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022
Externally publishedYes

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Crown Copyright 2022. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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