Are students really that different from their lecturers? A case study in perceptions of emerging learning technologies in higher education

I. B. Mateo-Babiano, A. Peterson, H. MacLeod, D. McGrath, D. Seeto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Emerging learning technologies (ELTs) have become a core facet of university life, but their role in teaching and learning is contested, and generally, not wellunderstood. By analyzing the perceptions of both academics and students towards ELTs, this paper aims to expand understanding of the role of ELTs in teaching and learning in one school in a research intensive university. Online surveys completed by both academics and students and smaller focus groups identified diverse perspectives on the uses of ELTs in the processes of learning in higher education. These results inform a strategic planning process at the school level to implement an Emerging Learning Technologies Preparedness Plan. Moreover, this discourse on the role of, costs and opportunities that ELTs afford is significant and timely to look at how to take a whole-of-school approach; and identify and evaluate pedagogical principles that foster active teaching and learning practices.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInformation and communication technology for education
EditorsMark Zhou
Place of PublicationSouthampton
PublisherWITPress
Pages1107-1113
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9781845649197
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventInternational Conference on Information and Communication Technology for education - Singapore
Duration: 1 Dec 20132 Dec 2013

Publication series

NameWIT transactions on information and communication technologies
PublisherWITPress
Volume58
ISSN (Print)1743-3517

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Information and Communication Technology for education
CitySingapore
Period1/12/132/12/13

Keywords

  • Digital technology
  • Strategic planning for ELTs

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