Arrivals and arrivals: Royal travel at Botany Bay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article looks at how the sites of the beach and the airport have functioned as chronotopes of 'arrivalism' in Australian history. I suggest that narratives surrounding Queen Elizabeth's 1970 royal tour of Australia, initiated and terminated at Sydney Airport, drew on existing structures of primitivism and modernity at the site of the beach. A re-enactment of Cook's landing at Botany Bay on Australia Day 1970 thus re-inscribed the nation within global space: it showed aboriginal people bearing witness to the (re-) arrival of the colonies. This narrative of national progress linked the British colonial project and Australian economic development - just as Cook 'discovered' Australia, the Queen's flight 'discovered' anew the international space of air travel and trade. A second re-enactment by trade unions and environmental protestors nearby on Australia Day 1976 contested this narrative, and offered an alternative nationalist vision at the site of the beach.

LanguageEnglish
Pages83-97
Number of pages15
JournalNational Identities
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2003
Externally publishedYes

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botany
beach
airport
air transportation
trade union
indigenous population
modernity
economic development
flight
history
travel
Botany
Colonies
Re-enactment

Cite this

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Arrivals and arrivals : Royal travel at Botany Bay. / Lloyd, Justine.

In: National Identities, Vol. 5, No. 1, 03.2003, p. 83-97.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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