Aspects of the interrelationships of attitudes and behaviour as illustrated by a longitudinal study of British adults

1. Interactions among attitudes and changing voting intentions

R. J. Johnston*, C. J. Pattie

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most models of people's voting intentions suggest that the choice of party to support is a function not only of external influences in the individual's home, neighbourhood, and workplace but also of their attitudes - their perspectives on society, their goals and values, their opinions on contemporary social and political issues, and their degree of attachment (if any) to the political parties and their programmes. Those models have been tested in Great Britain on many occasions, though the data employed rarely allow detailed exploration of all aspects of the many interrelationships suggested. In particular, the great majority of studies are cross-sectional in nature, and although most produce the same general findings, indicating stability in attitudes and their links to behaviour at the aggregate level, they do not allow study of whether such stability is also characteristic of individuals. With data provided by the first four waves of a large panel study of British adults (the British Household Panel Survey) this first paper in a series exploring the stability of attitude - behaviour links over time tests five hypotheses regarding the interrelations among attitudes, party identification, and voting (or voting intention) during the period 1991-94, and finds very strong support for all five.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)899-923
Number of pages25
JournalEnvironment and Planning A: Economy and Space
Volume31
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May 1999

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