Assessing patient information and decision-support needs in problematic alcohol use and co-occurring depression to inform shared decision-making interventions

Alana Fisher*, Christina Marel, Maree Teesson, Katherine Mills

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors assessed the informational and decision-support needs of patients, families, and clinicians when deciding on treatment for problematic alcohol use and depression. Patients (n = 56), family members (n = 16), and clinicians (n = 65) with experience deciding on treatment for problematic alcohol use and depression were eligible. Participants completed an online decisional needs assessment survey. Stakeholder groups identified numerous difficult patient-level treatment decisions and elevated decisional conflict. Participants preferred patient-led or shared treatment decision-making (75%-95.4%). Patients (32.6%) reported not being as involved in treatment decision-making as preferred, a higher proportion than reported by clinicians (16.4%; p = .056). More patients (19.6%) than clinicians (3.6%) reported clinician-led treatment decision-making, with little or no patient involvement (p = .022). Stakeholder preferences for future decision-support resources included online information for use outside consultations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-176
Number of pages34
JournalBulletin of the Menninger Clinic
Volume85
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • treatment decision-making
  • alcohol use issues
  • depression
  • needs assessment;
  • patient preferences
  • decision support

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