Assessment of temperature or salinity effects on larval development by catecholamine-induced metamorphosis of hatchery-reared flat oyster, Ostrea angasi (Sowerby 1871) larvae

Stephan O'Connor*, Natalie Moltschaniwskyj, Christopher J. S. Bolch, Wayne O'Connor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A need to improve larval rearing techniques led to the development of protocols for catecholamine-induced settlement of flat oyster, Ostrea angasi, larvae. To further refine these techniques and optimize settlement percentages, the influence of salinity or temperature on development of O. angasi larvae was assessed using epinephrine-induced metamorphosis. Larvae were reared between salinities of 15-35 and temperatures between 14.5 and 31°C. The greatest percentage survival, growth, development occurred when larvae were reared between 26 and 29°C and between salinities of 30 and 35. Larvae reared outside this salinity and temperature range exhibited reduced growth, survival and/or delayed development. Short-term (1 h) reduction in larval rearing temperature from 26°C to 23.5°C significantly increased larval metamorphosis without affecting larval survival. Short-term (1 h) increase in larval rearing temperature from 26°C to 29 and 31°C decreased larval survival and metamorphosis. To ensure repeatability in outcomes, tests showed that larvae sourced from different estuaries did not vary significantly in their metamorphic response to short-term temperature manipulation and epinephrine-induced metamorphosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2501-2511
Number of pages11
JournalAquaculture Research
Volume46
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Flat oyster
  • Larvae
  • Metamorphosis
  • Ostrea angasi
  • Salinity
  • Temperature

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