Association between adolescents’ consumption of total and different types of sugar-sweetened beverages with oral health impacts and weight status

Louise L. Hardy*, Jane Bell, Adrian Bauman, Seema Mihrshahi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the associations between adolescents’ intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) with oral health impacts (OHI) and weight status. Methods: Cross-sectional health survey with anthropometry and self-report OHI (toothache and avoiding some foods because of oral problems) and SSB intake (fruit juice, flavoured water, soft, diet, sports and energy drinks) collected in 2015. Results: A total of 3,671 adolescents participated (50% girls; mean age 13.2 years ±1.7). Drinking ≥1cup/day of SSBs was consistently associated with higher odds of OHI compared with drinking <1cup/day: diet soft drinks (AOR, 5.21 95%CI 2.67, 10.18); sports drinks (AOR 3.60 95%CI 1.93, 6.73); flavoured water (AOR 3.07 95%CI 1.55, 6.06); and energy drinks (AOR 2.14 95%CI 1.44, 3.19). Daily SSB intake was not consistently associated with weight status. The odds of overweight/obesity (AOR 1.27 95%CI 1.01, 1.59) and obesity (AOR 1.61 95%CI 1.01, 2.57) were higher for energy drink consumption, compared with not drinking energy drinks; and the odds of abdominal obesity were twice as high among adolescents who drank ≥1cup/day of sports drinks, compared with <1cup/day intake. Conclusions: Daily consumption of SSBs is prevalent among adolescents and is consistently associated with higher odds of OHI. The most popular SSBs among adolescents were energy drinks. Different types of SSB were differentially associated with OHI and weight status. Implications for public health: Different types of SSBs were differentially associated with OHI and weight status in adolescents. Diet soft drinks and new generation SSBs such as energy and sport drinks and flavoured water had a greater impact on adolescents’ OHI compared with soft drinks and fruit juice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-26
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2017. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • obesity
  • oral health impacts
  • sugar-sweetened beverages

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