Association of high-speed rail and tuberculosis transmission in newly integrated regions: quasi-experimental evidence from China

Yahong Liu, Chengxiang Tang, Tao Bu, Daisheng Tang

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Abstract

Objectives: The spread of tuberculosis (TB) is related to changes in the social network among the population and people's social interactions. High-speed railway (HSR) fundamentally changed the integrated market across cities in China. This paper aims to examine the impact of HSR on TB transmission in newly integrated areas.

Methods: By exploiting the opening and operation of the first HSR in Sichuan province as a quasi-natural experiment, we have collected and used the economic, social, and demographic data of 183 counties in Sichuan province from 2013 to 2016.

Results: The new HSR line is associated with a 4.790 increase in newly diagnosed smear-positive TB cases per 100,000 people among newly integrated areas. On average, an additional increase of 34.178 newly diagnosed smear-positive TB cases occur every year in counties (or districts) covered by the new HSR.

Conclusion: HSR development has significantly contributed to the transmission of TB. The public health system in China needs to pay more attention to the influences of new, mass public transportation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1604090
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Public Health
Volume66
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Nov 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2021 Liu, Tang, Bu and Tang. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • public health
  • China
  • high-speed railway
  • tuberculosis
  • public transportation
  • the tiered-network healthcare policy

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