Audio-visual and auditory paired comparison judgments by severely and profoundly hearing impaired children: Reliability and frequency response preferences

T. Ching*, P. Newall, D. Wigney

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study is aimed at: (1) assessing the feasibility of using the paired comparison procedure for intelligibility judgments by severely and profoundly hearing impaired children, (2) quantifying the relative reliability and sensitivity of judgments made in an audio-visual and an auditory alone condition, (3) determining whether the optimal frequency response of a hearing aid differs for audio-visual versus auditory alone listening. The subjects were 21 children (37 ears) at two schools for hearing impaired children with aural/oral programs. Testing was performed with the children wearing their hearing aids on the frequency response (tone) and volume settings normally used. The NAL frequency response was compared with three other frequency responses, and the children were required to choose the one which made speech easier to understand. Variations in frequency response were achieved by presenting recorded speech through a filter which had 4 settings: 6 dB/octave cut, 6 dB/octave boost, 12 dB/octave boost from 250 Hz to 2000 Hz, and an unfiltered setting. The results indicate that the paired comparison procedure can be used reliably with severely and profoundly hearing impaired children of six years and above, and the mode of presentation has little effect on the preferred frequency response for speech intelligibility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-106
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Journal of Audiology
Volume16
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Audio-visual and auditory paired comparison judgments by severely and profoundly hearing impaired children: Reliability and frequency response preferences'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this