Australian data for the children's action tendency scale, the children's depression inventory and fear survey schedule for children-revised

Susan H. Spence*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The majority of psychological assessment measures used with children rely on the use of U. S. normative data in their interpretation. Recent studies have brought into question the validity of equating Australian children with their U. S. peers, with findings of different normative values across the two cultures for some behavioural measures. This study reports data from three commonly used child self-report questionnaires, namely the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), the Fear Survey Schedule for Children—Revised (FSSC-R) and the Children's Action Tendency Scale (CATS). The Australian sample reported very similar results for the CDI and FSSC-R to those found with U. S. samples. Differences in scores across grades were found for the CATS which have not been reported in U. S. studies, suggesting that local norms should be used in its interpretation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)16-21
    Number of pages6
    JournalThe Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist
    Volume6
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1989

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Australian data for the children's action tendency scale, the children's depression inventory and fear survey schedule for children-revised'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this