Australian experience with 'new' environmental policy instruments

the Greenhouse Challenge and Greenhouse Friendly programs

Roslyn Taplin

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

    Abstract

    In association with international moves to address the impacts of global climate change some governments including those in the EU, US, Canada and Australia have taken steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions via 'new' environmental policy instruments (NEPIs) (e.g. voluntary agreements, emissions trading and ecolabelling). This has been in response to the Framework Convention on Climate Change and in anticipation of the Kyoto Protocol coming into force. This paper focuses on Australian experience with two particular NEPIs: the Greenhouse Challenge and Greenhouse Friendly programs. Empirical evidence on the evolution and effectiveness of these programs is related to theoretical discussion on the role of NEPIs in industrial transformation, social learning and sustainability. The success or effectiveness of these greenhouse NEPIs appears to be dependent on industry motivations and incentives for participation, the implementing agency's procedures and the design of the process for collaboration and information sharing between government and industry.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationGovernance for Industrial Transformation
    EditorsKlaus Jacob
    Place of PublicationBerlin, Germany
    PublisherEnvironmental Policy Research Centre, Freie Universitat
    Publication statusPublished - 2003
    Event2003 Berlin Conference on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Chnage - Berlin, Germany
    Duration: 5 Dec 20036 Dec 2003

    Conference

    Conference2003 Berlin Conference on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Chnage
    CityBerlin, Germany
    Period5/12/036/12/03

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