Behavioral and multimodal neuroimaging evidence for a deficit in brain timing networks in stuttering: a hypothesis and theory

Andrew C. Etchell, Blake W. Johnson, Paul F. Sowman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

56 Citations (Scopus)
22 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The fluent production of speech requires accurately timed movements. In this article, we propose that a deficit in brain timing networks is one of the core neurophysiological deficits in stuttering. We first discuss the experimental evidence supporting the involvement of the basal ganglia and supplementary motor area (SMA) in stuttering and the involvement of the cerebellum as a possible mechanism for compensating for the neural deficits that underlie stuttering. Next, we outline the involvement of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) as another putative compensatory locus in stuttering and suggest a role for this structure in an expanded core timing-network. Subsequently, we review behavioral studies of timing in people who stutter and examine their behavioral performance as compared to people who do not stutter. Finally, we highlight challenges to existing research and provide avenues for future research with specific hypotheses.

Original languageEnglish
Article number467
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jun 2014

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author/s. This Document is protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.

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