Behavioural Treatment of Childhood Recurrent Abdominal Pain

Relationships Between Pain, Children's Psychological Characteristics and Family Functioning

Matthew R. Sanders, Margaret Morrison, Margaret Rebgetz, William Bor, Mark Dadds, Ross Shepherd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the impact and side effects of a cognitive behavioural program for the treatment of recurrent abdominal pain (R.A.P.) on children's behavioural adjustment and family functioning. It assessed the extent to which changes in children's pain symptoms covaried with family processes thought to be etiologically significant in cases of R.A.P. Results showed that pain symptoms of both experimental and control children improved significantly six months after initial assessment. Treatment achieved its objectives more quickly with a higher proportion of completely pain-free children. None of the measures of child adjustment or family conflict, expressiveness, independence or achievement orientation were associated with changes in pain intensity ratings or parent observational measures of pain behaviour. There was no evidence that treatment was associated with any negative side effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-24
Number of pages9
JournalBehaviour Change
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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