Best practice adherence and workplace facilitators and hindrances for psychologists working with individuals with intellectual disabilities and co-morbid mental health concerns

Joyce Man, Maria Kangas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A number of practice guidelines are available to set the benchmark for best practice when working with individuals with intellectual disabilities and co-morbid mental health concerns. However, dissemination and implementation of such guidelines in the context of psychologists' work settings has received little attention. The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate adherence to current practice guidelines by Australian psychologists working with this specialist population and explore organizational factors that may facilitate or hinder evidence-based practice implementation. Thirty-eight Australian psychologists from government disability and non-government disability organizations working primarily with individuals with intellectual disability participated in eight semistructured focus groups. Psychologists were presented with a summary of a current Australian practice guideline in dual disabilities and asked about their views of best practice adherence and implementation of the guideline including facilitative and hindering factors influencing implementation. Psychologists reported views consistent with current Australian best practice standards but noted a number of barriers impacting on adherence. Facilitators and hindrances to best practice implementation were discussed in relation to views on applicability of current guideline, organizational level considerations, organizational resources and training, organizational operations, and systemic considerations. Findings highlight the importance of a collaborative and systemic approach in order for practice guidelines to be effectively implemented for psychologists working with disabilities. Implications for policy development and training are discussed.

LanguageEnglish
Pages239-249
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume16
Issue number3
Early online date10 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

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Practice Guidelines
psychologist
Workplace
Intellectual Disability
best practice
Mental Health
workplace
disability
mental health
Psychology
Guidelines
Guideline Adherence
Benchmarking
development policy
Policy Making
Evidence-Based Practice
Focus Groups
Organizations
resources
evidence

Keywords

  • best practice
  • intellectual disability
  • mental health
  • organization
  • psychologists

Cite this

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