Biomarkers provide clues to early events in the pathogenesis of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma

Marshall E. Kadin, Anand Deva, Haiying Xu, John Morgan, Pranay Khare, Roderick A F MacLeod, Bruce W. Van Natta, William P. Adams, Garry S. Brody, Alan L. Epstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Almost 200 women worldwide have been diagnosed with breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL). The unique location and specific lymphoma type strongly suggest an etio-pathologic link between breast implants and BIA-ALCL. It is postulated that chronic inflammation via bacterial infection may be an etiological factor. BIA-ALCL resembles primary cutaneous ALCL ( pcALCL) in morphology, activated T-cell phenotype, and indolent clinical course. Gene expression array analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to study pcALCL and BIA-ALCL cell lines. Clinical samples were also studied to characterize transcription factor and cytokine profiles of tumor cells and surrounding lymphocytes. BIA-ALCL and pcALCL were found to have common expression of transcription factors SOCS3, JunB, SATB1, and a cytokine profile suggestive of a Th1 phenotype. Similar patterns were observed in a CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). The patterns of cytokine and transcription factor expression suggest that BIAALCL is likely to arise from chronic bacterial antigen stimulation of T-cells. Further analysis of cytokine and transcription factor profiles may allow early detection and treatment of BIA-ALCL leading to better prognosis and survival.

LanguageEnglish
Pages773-781
Number of pages9
JournalAesthetic surgery journal
Volume36
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016

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Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma
Breast Implants
Biomarkers
Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma
Transcription Factors
Cytokines
Bacterial Antigens
T-Lymphocytes
Phenotype
Skin
Lymphoproliferative Disorders
Bacterial Infections
Lymphoma
Flow Cytometry
Immunohistochemistry
Lymphocytes
Inflammation
Gene Expression
Cell Line
Survival

Cite this

Kadin, Marshall E. ; Deva, Anand ; Xu, Haiying ; Morgan, John ; Khare, Pranay ; MacLeod, Roderick A F ; Van Natta, Bruce W. ; Adams, William P. ; Brody, Garry S. ; Epstein, Alan L. / Biomarkers provide clues to early events in the pathogenesis of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. In: Aesthetic surgery journal. 2016 ; Vol. 36, No. 7. pp. 773-781.
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abstract = "Almost 200 women worldwide have been diagnosed with breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (BIA-ALCL). The unique location and specific lymphoma type strongly suggest an etio-pathologic link between breast implants and BIA-ALCL. It is postulated that chronic inflammation via bacterial infection may be an etiological factor. BIA-ALCL resembles primary cutaneous ALCL ( pcALCL) in morphology, activated T-cell phenotype, and indolent clinical course. Gene expression array analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to study pcALCL and BIA-ALCL cell lines. Clinical samples were also studied to characterize transcription factor and cytokine profiles of tumor cells and surrounding lymphocytes. BIA-ALCL and pcALCL were found to have common expression of transcription factors SOCS3, JunB, SATB1, and a cytokine profile suggestive of a Th1 phenotype. Similar patterns were observed in a CD30+ cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). The patterns of cytokine and transcription factor expression suggest that BIAALCL is likely to arise from chronic bacterial antigen stimulation of T-cells. Further analysis of cytokine and transcription factor profiles may allow early detection and treatment of BIA-ALCL leading to better prognosis and survival.",
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Kadin, ME, Deva, A, Xu, H, Morgan, J, Khare, P, MacLeod, RAF, Van Natta, BW, Adams, WP, Brody, GS & Epstein, AL 2016, 'Biomarkers provide clues to early events in the pathogenesis of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma' Aesthetic surgery journal, vol. 36, no. 7, pp. 773-781. https://doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjw023

Biomarkers provide clues to early events in the pathogenesis of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. / Kadin, Marshall E.; Deva, Anand; Xu, Haiying; Morgan, John; Khare, Pranay; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Van Natta, Bruce W.; Adams, William P.; Brody, Garry S.; Epstein, Alan L.

In: Aesthetic surgery journal, Vol. 36, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 773-781.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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