Biting off more than you can chew: attempted predation on a human by a giant snake (Simalia amethistina)

Daniel Natusch*, Jessica Lyons, Lea Ann Mears, Richard Shine

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)
    6 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    On 10 March 2014, a radio-tracked Australian scrub python (Simalia amethistina) made a predatory attack on a 64 kg sleeping woman. The snake was unsuccessful, but data from our radio-tracking programme suggest that predation attempts on oversized prey are not uncommon – even if they threaten the survival of the predator. We explore hypotheses about why snakes attempt to consume such large meals.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)159-162
    Number of pages4
    JournalAustral Ecology
    Volume46
    Issue number1
    Early online date6 Oct 2020
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021

    Keywords

    • Cape York
    • constrictor
    • feeding ecology
    • Morelia kinghorni
    • oversized
    • scrub python

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Biting off more than you can chew: attempted predation on a human by a giant snake (<i>Simalia amethistina</i>)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this