Boudica, Cartimandua, Messalina and Agrippina the Younger. Independent women of power and the gendered rhetoric of Roman history

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Abstract

This paper examines the literary sources that form the substance of the historical record as it relates to the years leading up to the rebellion of Boudica, ruler of the Iceni tribe, in the early years of the Roman rule in Britain (43-60/61 CE). It attempts to show how these sources intersect with the representations of contemporary females of historical significance (Cartimandua of the Brigantes, and, more briefly, the Julio-Claudian women of power and influence, Valeria Messalina and Julia Agrippina) and to indicate some of the problems and difficulties encountered in their use. This will entail some comment on the representations in the same sources of the principes Claudius and Nero and their British contemporaries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-43
Number of pages43
JournalAncient history : resources for teachers
Volume34
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Bibliographical note

Publisher version archived with the permission of the Editor, Ancient History : resources for Teachers, Macquarie Ancient History Association, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. This copy is available for individual, non-commercial use. Permission to reprint/republish this version for other uses must be obtained from the publisher.

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