Cambrian stratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Flinders Ranges and the north coast of Kangaroo Island, South Australia

James B. Jago*, James G. Gehling, John R. Paterson, Glenn A. Brock, Wenlong Zang

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    37 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The lower Cambrian sediments of the Flinders Ranges, South Australia can be divided into three sequence sets. They rest unconformably on the Ediacaran succession. Sequence set C- 1 comprises lower clastic units overlain by a carbonate dominated marine succession that shows marked lateral and vertical facies changes. Sequence sets C- 2 and C- 3 together comprise a largely clastic dominated succession of marginal marine to nonmarine sediments with subordinate shallow marine carbonates. Sequence set C- 1 is richly fossiliferous at some levels with biostratigraphy established for trilobites, archaeocyaths, brachiopods, small shelly fossils, acritarchs and molluscs. The Emu Bay Shale Lagerstätte (Cambrian Series 2) from the north coast of Kangaroo Island occurs within a clastic-rich shelf succession dominated by conglomerate and sandstone. The fossil content is dominated by trilobites in terms of relative abundance and currently over 50 taxa are known including, Anomalocaris, the bivalved arthropods Isoxys and Tuzoia, the nektaspids Emucaris and Kangacaris, the megacheiran Oestokerkus amongst a variety of other arthropods. Other common taxa include palaeoscolecid worms, Myoscolex, sponges, hyoliths, brachiopods, a vetulicolian and several other enigmatic forms. The oldest known well preserved complex arthropod eyes occur in this biota.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)247-255
    Number of pages9
    JournalEpisodes
    Volume35
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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