Can media neutrality limit creative potential?: How advertising’s use of ideation templates fares across media

Alexander Tevi, Scott Koslow, John Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article approaches the question of media neutrality by investigating whether ideation techniques such as templates produce the same quality of advertisements across media. Some 207 advertising professionals responded to a hypothetical brief with one print and one television advertisement. Self-reported results showed that ideas from two media-dependent techniques (unification and metaphor) worked well across media, whereas ideas from one message-dependent technique (extreme consequence) and the control condition did not. By their nature, however, media-dependent techniques make for less-consistent content across media, whereas message-dependent techniques have more consistent expressions across media. Campaign consistency and quality therefore trade off, limiting media neutrality.

LanguageEnglish
Pages312-328
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Advertising Research
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

neutrality
Television
Marketing
pricing
Neutrality
Ideation
Template
metaphor
television
campaign

Cite this

@article{a4b0521c5770443d8a60025fc21189c2,
title = "Can media neutrality limit creative potential?: How advertising’s use of ideation templates fares across media",
abstract = "This article approaches the question of media neutrality by investigating whether ideation techniques such as templates produce the same quality of advertisements across media. Some 207 advertising professionals responded to a hypothetical brief with one print and one television advertisement. Self-reported results showed that ideas from two media-dependent techniques (unification and metaphor) worked well across media, whereas ideas from one message-dependent technique (extreme consequence) and the control condition did not. By their nature, however, media-dependent techniques make for less-consistent content across media, whereas message-dependent techniques have more consistent expressions across media. Campaign consistency and quality therefore trade off, limiting media neutrality.",
author = "Alexander Tevi and Scott Koslow and John Parker",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2501/JAR-2018-040",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "312--328",
journal = "Journal of Advertising Research",
issn = "1740-1909",
publisher = "World Advertising Research Center",
number = "3",

}

Can media neutrality limit creative potential? How advertising’s use of ideation templates fares across media. / Tevi, Alexander; Koslow, Scott; Parker, John.

In: Journal of Advertising Research, Vol. 59, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 312-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can media neutrality limit creative potential?

T2 - Journal of Advertising Research

AU - Tevi, Alexander

AU - Koslow, Scott

AU - Parker, John

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - This article approaches the question of media neutrality by investigating whether ideation techniques such as templates produce the same quality of advertisements across media. Some 207 advertising professionals responded to a hypothetical brief with one print and one television advertisement. Self-reported results showed that ideas from two media-dependent techniques (unification and metaphor) worked well across media, whereas ideas from one message-dependent technique (extreme consequence) and the control condition did not. By their nature, however, media-dependent techniques make for less-consistent content across media, whereas message-dependent techniques have more consistent expressions across media. Campaign consistency and quality therefore trade off, limiting media neutrality.

AB - This article approaches the question of media neutrality by investigating whether ideation techniques such as templates produce the same quality of advertisements across media. Some 207 advertising professionals responded to a hypothetical brief with one print and one television advertisement. Self-reported results showed that ideas from two media-dependent techniques (unification and metaphor) worked well across media, whereas ideas from one message-dependent technique (extreme consequence) and the control condition did not. By their nature, however, media-dependent techniques make for less-consistent content across media, whereas message-dependent techniques have more consistent expressions across media. Campaign consistency and quality therefore trade off, limiting media neutrality.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85073603986&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2501/JAR-2018-040

DO - 10.2501/JAR-2018-040

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 312

EP - 328

JO - Journal of Advertising Research

JF - Journal of Advertising Research

SN - 1740-1909

IS - 3

ER -