Can requests-for-action and commitments-to-act be reliably identified in email messages?

Andrew Lampert*, Cécile Paris, Robert Dale

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports on the results of an exploratory annotation task where three coders classified the presence and strength of Requests-for-Action (requests) and Commitments-to-Act (promises) in workplace email messages. The purpose of our annotation task was to explore levels of human agreement to establish whether this is a repeatable task that lends itself to automation. The results from our annotation task suggest that there is relatively high agreement about which sentences embody Requests-for-Action (Κ = 0.78), but poorer agreement about Commitments-to-Act (Κ = 0.54). Analysis of cases of coder disagreement highlighted several areas of systematic disagreement which we believe can be addressed through refining our annotation guidelines. Given this scope for improving agreement, we believe the results presented here are encouraging for our intention to perform largerscale annotation work leading to automation of the detection and classification of Requests-for-Action and Commitments-to-Act in email communication.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationADCS 2007 - Proceedings of the Twelfth Australasian Document Computing Symposium
EditorsAmanda Spink, Andrew Turpin, Mingfang Wu
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages48-55
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9780646484372
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Event12th Australasian Document Computing Symposium, ACDS 2007 - Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Duration: 10 Dec 200710 Dec 2007

Other

Other12th Australasian Document Computing Symposium, ACDS 2007
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne, VIC
Period10/12/0710/12/07

Keywords

  • Document management
  • Document workflow
  • Email
  • Speech acts
  • Task management

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