Can the dual-route cascaded computational model of reading offer a valid account of the masked onset priming effect?

Petroula Mousikou, Max Coltheart, Matthew Finkbeiner, Steven Saunders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The masked onset priming effect (MOPE) refers to the empirical finding that target naming is faster when the target (SIB) is preceded by a briefly presented masked prime that starts with the same letter/phoneme (suf) than when it does not (mof; Kinoshita, 2000, Experiment 1). The dual-route cascaded (DRC) computational model of reading (Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001) has offered an explanation for how the MOPE might occur in humans. However, there has been some empirical discrepancy regarding whether for nonword items the effect is limited to the first-letter/phoneme overlap between primes and targets or whether orthographic/phonological priming effects occur beyond the first letter/phoneme. Experiment 1 tested these two possibilities. The human results, which were successfully simulated by the DRC model, showed priming beyond the first letter/phoneme. Nevertheless, two recent versions of the DRC model made different predictions regarding the nature of these priming effects. Experiment 2 examined whether it is facilitatory, inhibitory, or both, in order to adjudicate between the two versions of the model. The human results showed that primes exert both facilitatory and inhibitory effects.

LanguageEnglish
Pages984-1003
Number of pages20
JournalQuarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Volume63
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2010

Fingerprint

Reading

Cite this

@article{02b91f8e928740f4bc22e80b16f1869f,
title = "Can the dual-route cascaded computational model of reading offer a valid account of the masked onset priming effect?",
abstract = "The masked onset priming effect (MOPE) refers to the empirical finding that target naming is faster when the target (SIB) is preceded by a briefly presented masked prime that starts with the same letter/phoneme (suf) than when it does not (mof; Kinoshita, 2000, Experiment 1). The dual-route cascaded (DRC) computational model of reading (Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001) has offered an explanation for how the MOPE might occur in humans. However, there has been some empirical discrepancy regarding whether for nonword items the effect is limited to the first-letter/phoneme overlap between primes and targets or whether orthographic/phonological priming effects occur beyond the first letter/phoneme. Experiment 1 tested these two possibilities. The human results, which were successfully simulated by the DRC model, showed priming beyond the first letter/phoneme. Nevertheless, two recent versions of the DRC model made different predictions regarding the nature of these priming effects. Experiment 2 examined whether it is facilitatory, inhibitory, or both, in order to adjudicate between the two versions of the model. The human results showed that primes exert both facilitatory and inhibitory effects.",
author = "Petroula Mousikou and Max Coltheart and Matthew Finkbeiner and Steven Saunders",
year = "2010",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1080/17470210903156586",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "984--1003",
journal = "Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology",
issn = "1747-0218",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "5",

}

Can the dual-route cascaded computational model of reading offer a valid account of the masked onset priming effect? / Mousikou, Petroula; Coltheart, Max; Finkbeiner, Matthew; Saunders, Steven.

In: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, Vol. 63, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 984-1003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Can the dual-route cascaded computational model of reading offer a valid account of the masked onset priming effect?

AU - Mousikou, Petroula

AU - Coltheart, Max

AU - Finkbeiner, Matthew

AU - Saunders, Steven

PY - 2010/5

Y1 - 2010/5

N2 - The masked onset priming effect (MOPE) refers to the empirical finding that target naming is faster when the target (SIB) is preceded by a briefly presented masked prime that starts with the same letter/phoneme (suf) than when it does not (mof; Kinoshita, 2000, Experiment 1). The dual-route cascaded (DRC) computational model of reading (Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001) has offered an explanation for how the MOPE might occur in humans. However, there has been some empirical discrepancy regarding whether for nonword items the effect is limited to the first-letter/phoneme overlap between primes and targets or whether orthographic/phonological priming effects occur beyond the first letter/phoneme. Experiment 1 tested these two possibilities. The human results, which were successfully simulated by the DRC model, showed priming beyond the first letter/phoneme. Nevertheless, two recent versions of the DRC model made different predictions regarding the nature of these priming effects. Experiment 2 examined whether it is facilitatory, inhibitory, or both, in order to adjudicate between the two versions of the model. The human results showed that primes exert both facilitatory and inhibitory effects.

AB - The masked onset priming effect (MOPE) refers to the empirical finding that target naming is faster when the target (SIB) is preceded by a briefly presented masked prime that starts with the same letter/phoneme (suf) than when it does not (mof; Kinoshita, 2000, Experiment 1). The dual-route cascaded (DRC) computational model of reading (Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001) has offered an explanation for how the MOPE might occur in humans. However, there has been some empirical discrepancy regarding whether for nonword items the effect is limited to the first-letter/phoneme overlap between primes and targets or whether orthographic/phonological priming effects occur beyond the first letter/phoneme. Experiment 1 tested these two possibilities. The human results, which were successfully simulated by the DRC model, showed priming beyond the first letter/phoneme. Nevertheless, two recent versions of the DRC model made different predictions regarding the nature of these priming effects. Experiment 2 examined whether it is facilitatory, inhibitory, or both, in order to adjudicate between the two versions of the model. The human results showed that primes exert both facilitatory and inhibitory effects.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77951706904&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/17470210903156586

DO - 10.1080/17470210903156586

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 984

EP - 1003

JO - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

T2 - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

JF - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

SN - 1747-0218

IS - 5

ER -