Cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent: Insights from repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers and the modified Oxford method

Helen M. Horsman, Karen C. Peebles, Duncan C. Galletly, Yu Chieh Tzeng*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cardiac baroreflex gain is usually quantified as the reflex alteration in heart rate during changes in blood pressure without considering the effect of the rate of change in blood pressure on the estimated gain. This study sought to (i) characterize baroreflex gain as a function of blood pressure oscillation frequencies using a repeat sit-to-stand method and (ii) compare baroreflex gain values obtained using the sit-to-stand method against the modified Oxford method. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent the repeated sit-to-stand method in which blood pressure oscillations were driven at 0.03, 0.05, 0.07, and 0.1 Hz. Sixteen healthy participants underwent the sit-to-stand and modified Oxford methods to examine their agreement. Sit-to-stand baroreflex gain was highest at 0.05 Hz (8.8 ± 3.2 ms·mm Hg-1) and lowest at 0.1 Hz (5.8 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg-1). Baroreflex gains at 0.03 Hz (7.7 ± 3.0 ms·mm Hg-1) and 0.07 Hz (7.5 ± 3.3 ms·mm Hg-1) were not different from the baroreflex gain at 0.05 Hz. There was moderate correlation between phenylephrine gain and sit-to-stand gain (r values ranged from 0.52 to 0.75; all frequencies, p < 0.05), but no correlation between sodium nitroprusside gain and sit-to-stand gain (r values ranged from -0.07 to 0.22; all p < 0.05). Bland-Altman analysis of phenylephrine gain and sit-to-stand gain showed poor agreement and a positive proportional bias. These results show that baroreflex gains derived from these 2 methods cannot be used interchangeably. Furthermore, cardiac baroreflex gain is frequency dependent between 0.03 Hz and 0.1 Hz, which challenges the conventional practice of summarizing baroreflex gain as a single number.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)753-759
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume38
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

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