Catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization allows for enrichment-independent detection of microcolony-forming soil bacteria

Belinda C. Ferrari*, Niina Tujula, Kate Stoner, Staffan Kjelleberg

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    39 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Advances in the growth of hitherto unculturable soil bacteria have emphasized the requirement for rapid bacterial identification methods. Due to the slow-growing strategy of microcolony-forming soil bacteria, successful fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) requires an rRNA enrichment step for visualization. In this study, catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH was employed as an alternative method to rRNA enhancement and was found to be superior to conventional FISH for the detection of microcolonies that are cultivated by using the soil substrate membrane system. CARD-FISH enabled real-time identification of oligophilic microcolony-forming soil bacteria without the requirement for enrichment on complex media and the associated shifts in community composition.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)918-922
    Number of pages5
    JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
    Volume72
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2006

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