Challenges for accounting and business education: blending online and traditional universities in a MOOC environment

James Guthrie, Roger Burritt, Elaine Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Online education models have existed since the dot-com boom at the turn of the century, originating from a longer history of distance education. However, the launch of Stanford University’s 'Introduction to Artificial Intelligence' in 2011 heralded a new era of massive open online courses (MOOCs). The free course attracted over 160,000 students from over 190 countries within a few weeks. Almost 20,000 students completed the course and received a 'Statement of Accomplishment'. Although the experience was not a substitute for a Stanford degree, and did not provide course credits for actual degrees, it delivered a 'prestige credential adapted to the internet' (Marginson, 2012). The paradigm shift in higher education then accelerated when Harvard University jumped on board, partnering with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to launch edX in May 2012 (Carey, 2012). Previously, online education was provided by newer, less prestigious institutions (Norton, 2012). Now it has become mainstream; traditional universities need to develop strategies to meet the challenge.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-22
Number of pages14
JournalAcademic leadership series
Volume4
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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