Changes in audiometric thresholds before, during and after attacks of vertigo associated with Meniere's syndrome

Celene McNeill*, Mauricio A. Cohen, William P R Gibson

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Conclusion: No significant changes in hearing thresholds were observed during vertigo attacks associated with Meniere's disease. Objectives: To determine if the hearing alters during the period of the attacks of vertigo in Meniere's disease. Patients and methods: The study group consisted of patients who had a clinical diagnosis of definite Meniere's syndrome according to the AAOOHNS criteria, a score on the Gibson scale of 7 or over and an enhanced negative summating potential on transtympanic electrocochleography. These patients were supplied with a programmable hearing aid and a portable programmer that allowed them to measure their own hearing in situ. They were asked to measure their audiometric thresholds daily and if possible during the attacks of vertigo. Results: Six of the patients were able to measure their hearing during attacks of vertigo and their hearing thresholds obtained before, during and after the vertigo attacks were compared. Five of six subjects showed <10 dBHL change in the hearing levels at all tested audiometric frequencies before, during and after the attacks of vertigo. One subject had a probable change in threshold before the attack but not during the attack of vertigo.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1404-1407
    Number of pages4
    JournalActa Oto-Laryngologica
    Volume129
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

    Keywords

    • Dizziness
    • Fluctuating hearing loss
    • Hearing aids
    • Rupture theory

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