Changes in blood volume pulse during exercise recovery in activity-based therapy for spinal cord injury.

Yvonne Tran*, Ranjit Thuraisingham, Ashley Craig, Erika Tomlinson, Glen M. Davis, James Middleton, Hung Nguyen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents the results of cardiovascular changes that occur during a novel rehabilitation strategy called activity based therapy (ABT). Blood volume pulse (BVP) signals were measured during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-induced cycling in adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) persons and results were compared to a passive cycling task and able-bodied controls performing normal cycling. BVP signals were compared during three conditions, a baseline pre-exercise condition, 5 minutes after exercise and after 30-minutes rest following exercise. Exercise recovery was evaluated using normalized inner products values in BVP signals. The results showed that FES-induced cycling in SCI participants resulted in a significantly greater peripheral resistance level and longer time to recover from exercise compared with passive cycling and normal cycling in able-bodied controls.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2011 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages693-696
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781424441228, 9781457715891
ISBN (Print)9781424441211
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: 30 Aug 20113 Sep 2011

Other

Other33rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS 2011
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period30/08/113/09/11

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