Chemical Evolution of Formation Waters in the Palm Valley Gas Field, Northern Territory: Impact on Field Management

A. S. Andrew, D. J. Whitford, M. D. Berry, A. M. Giblin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The chemical composition and evolution of formation waters associated with gas production in the Palm Valley field, Northern Territory, has important implications for reservoir management, saline water disposal, and gas reserve calculations. Historically, the occurrence of saline formation water in gas fields has been the subject of considerable debate. At Palm Valley gas field there were no occurrences of mobile water early in the development of the field and, only after the gas production had reduced the reservoir pressure, was saline formation water produced. Initially this was in small quantities but has increased dramatically with time, particularly after the installation of compression in November 1996. Produced waters from the field have been chemically and isotopically characterized in order to investigate the origin of the extreme salinity observed in some cases. The produced waters range from highly saline (TDS=>300,000), with unusual enrichments in Ca, Ba and Sr, to very low salinity fluids that may represent condensate waters. The Sr isotopic compositions of the waters are also variable but do not correlate closely with major and trace element abundances. The formation waters preserve chemical and isotopic heterogeneities and are thus not well mixed. The high salinity brines have Sr isotopic compositions and other geochemical characteristics more consistent with long term residence within the reservoir rocks than with present-day derivation from a more distal pool of brines associated with underlying evaporites. This conclusion is important in that the brines, if locally derived, may be less significant volumetrically than might be expected if there was present-day hydrological continuity between the reservoir and the evaporites.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - SPE Asia Pacific Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition, Winning Technology and Teamwork, APOGCE 2000
Place of PublicationRichardson, Texas
PublisherSociety of Petroleum Engineers
Pages969-980
Number of pages12
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings - SPE Asia Pacific Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition, Winning Technology and Teamwork, APOGCE 2000 - Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Duration: 16 Oct 200018 Oct 2000

Other

OtherProceedings - SPE Asia Pacific Oil and Gas Conference and Exhibition, Winning Technology and Teamwork, APOGCE 2000
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane, QLD
Period16/10/0018/10/00

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