Child, infant and foetal burials in the Egyptian archaeological record: exploring cultural capacities from the Predynastic to Middle Kingdom Periods (ca. 4400-1650 BC)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

This research investigates how current perceptions of ancient Egyptian child, infant and foetal mortuary culture correspond with its actual nature and scope. To date, scholars have surmised that published cemetery data rarely include significant numbers of juvenile burials. This apparent absence is attributed to differential burial practices, assuming that young individuals were not considered embodied community members. Quantitative data analyses recalibrates these perspectives and revises children’s cultural capacities in Egyptian society. Consistent observations of similarities between child and adult mortuary culture refute hypotheses of differential mortuary treatment and indicate ontological equity during the timeframes of the research.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationChildren in antiquity
Subtitle of host publicationperspectives and experiences of childhood in the ancient Mediterranean
EditorsLesley A. Beaumont, Matthew Dillon, Nicola Harrington
Place of PublicationLondon ; New York
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor and Francis Group
Chapter29
Pages415-429
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781315542812
ISBN (Print)9781138780866
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Publication series

NameRewriting Antiquity
PublisherRoutledge

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