Children find friendly words friendly too

words with many orthographic neighbours are easier to read and spell

VERONICA J. LAXON*, VERONIKA COLTHEART, CORRIENE KEATING

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary. Forty‐nine children (aged 8:4 to 10:4) were grouped according to reading ability and were tested on lexical decision, naming and spelling of words and non‐words which differed in orthographic neighbourhood size. Friendly words with many neighbours caused significantly fewer errors on all these tasks. Item analysis demonstrated that these effects were robust when corrected for frequency, regularity, word length and age of acquisition. Good readers showed less reliance on neighbourhood size and more evidence of accurate use of grapheme‐phoneme correspondence rules. The results indicate that children find common orthographic sequences easier to read and spell before they have learned to use grapheme‐phoneme correspondences consistently. 1988 The British Psychological Society

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)103-119
Number of pages17
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Psychology
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Children find friendly words friendly too: words with many orthographic neighbours are easier to read and spell'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this