Children's Susceptibility to Retroactive Interference: The Effects of Age and Degree of Learning

Kerry Lee*, Kay Bussey

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The effects of age and degree of learning on children's susceptibility to retroactive interference were examined. Children (4- and 7-year-olds) participated in a target game either once or three times. Each time, they learned the target stimuli to criterion. Two days later, the children either rested or participated in a second game containing inconsistent information. Retrieval tests were administered 3 weeks later. Children who participated in the target game repeatedly recognized more information from that game, both accurately and as intrusions, than did children who participated only once. Both age groups were susceptible to retroactive interference; degree of susceptibility was affected by neither age nor degree of learning. Nevertheless, the 7-year-olds were more accurate at test. These findings suggest that differences in the forgetting rate between 4- and 7-year-olds are not caused by differential susceptibility to retroactive interference.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)372-391
    Number of pages20
    JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
    Volume80
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2001

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