Clinical and psychological correlates of hearing aid use

C. Sawyer, P. Dawes, C. Armitage, K. Munro

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting abstract

Abstract

Background: Up to 40% of new hearing aid users in the UK do not use their hearing aids regularly. Non-use or suboptimal use of hearing aids waste NHS resources and impacts people with hearing impairment. The present study sought to identify factors that drive sustained and successful hearing aid use that will provide valuable information for future interventions to promote hearing aid use. Methods: Prospective survey design. Adults with hearing impairment (N=67) who were eligible for a hearing aid were recruited from NHS audiology clinics. Participants completed a questionnaire designed to tap Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) constructs at the time of hearing assessment. Average daily hours of hearing aid use were measured by automatic data-logging and captured 8-10 weeks post-assessment. The Spearman’s rank and zero-order correlations was conducted to estimate the effect size between HAPA constructs, self-reported and an objective measure of hearing loss and hearing aid use. Findings: 67 participants have been recruited to date, 33 of whom have yielded data-logging information. Initial analysis found self-reported hearing loss was related to hearing aid use, with a medium effect (r=0.33). Objective measures of hearing loss was related to hearing aid use, with a small to medium effect (r=0.24). Discussions: Initial analysis has demonstrated self-reported and objective measures of hearing loss were related to objective hearing aid use. A clearer picture will require recruitment of a larger sample of patients and additional analyses, but the present research constitutes a step towards developing a theory-based intervention to improve hearing aid use.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)927
Number of pages1
JournalEuropean Health Psychologist
Volume18
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes
EventJoint 2016 Annual conference of the European Health Psychology Society and the British Psychology Society Division of Health Psychology - University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Duration: 23 Aug 201627 Aug 2016

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical and psychological correlates of hearing aid use'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this