Clinical communication skills learning outcomes among first year medical students are consistent irrespective of participation in an interview for admission to medical school

Mavourneen Casey*, David Wilkinson, Jennifer Fitzgerald, Diann Eley, Jason Connor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although contentious most medical schools interview potential students to assess personal abilities such as communication. Aims: To investigate any differences in clinical communication skills (CCS) between first year students admitted to UQ medical school with or without an admissions interview. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 1495 student assessment scores obtained after structured communication skills training (CCS) between 2007 and 2010. Results: The average assessment score was 3.76 ([95% CI, 3.73-3.78]) and adjusting for student characteristics, showed no main effect for interview (p=0.89). The strongest predictor of scores was gender with females achieving significantly higher scores (3.91 [95% CI, 3.54-4.28] vs. 3.76 [95% CI, 3.39-4.13]; p≤0.001). Conclusions: Data show no differences in post-training assessment measures between students who were interviewed during selection or not. Further research about the quality and retention of communications skills after training is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)640-642
Number of pages3
JournalMedical teacher
Volume36
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Clinical communication skills learning outcomes among first year medical students are consistent irrespective of participation in an interview for admission to medical school'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this