Cochlear implant design considerations

Blake S. Wilson, Michael F. Dorman, René H. Gifford, David McAlpine

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The design and performance of the present-day cochlear implants are described. In broad terms, the design principles now in use include (1) representing at least most of the information that can be perceived according to place, frequency, and intensity of stimulation; (2) not making any assumptions about sounds in the environment or in particular how speech is produced or perceived; (3) minimizing electrode interactions; (4) using appropriate mapping functions and other aspects of processing to minimize perceptual distortions; and (5) presenting electric stimuli to both cochleas or presenting acoustic plus electric stimuli when possible. Applications of these principles have produced high levels of speech reception for the great majority of implant users and the first substantial restoration of a human sense using a medical intervention.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationPediatric Cochlear Implantation: Learning and the Brain
EditorsNancy M. Young, Karen Iler Kirk
Place of PublicationNew York ; Heidelberg
PublisherSpringer, Springer Nature
Pages3-23
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781493927883
ISBN (Print)9781493927876
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

Fingerprint

Cochlear Implants
Perceptual Distortion
Cochlea
Acoustics
Electrodes

Keywords

  • Auditory prosthesis
  • Cochlear implant
  • Cochlear prosthesis
  • Deafness
  • Electrical stimulation
  • Hearing
  • Neural prosthesis
  • Speech perception

Cite this

Wilson, B. S., Dorman, M. F., Gifford, R. H., & McAlpine, D. (2016). Cochlear implant design considerations. In N. M. Young, & K. I. Kirk (Eds.), Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Learning and the Brain (pp. 3-23). New York ; Heidelberg : Springer, Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-2788-3_1
Wilson, Blake S. ; Dorman, Michael F. ; Gifford, René H. ; McAlpine, David. / Cochlear implant design considerations. Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Learning and the Brain. editor / Nancy M. Young ; Karen Iler Kirk. New York ; Heidelberg : Springer, Springer Nature, 2016. pp. 3-23
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Wilson, BS, Dorman, MF, Gifford, RH & McAlpine, D 2016, Cochlear implant design considerations. in NM Young & KI Kirk (eds), Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Learning and the Brain. Springer, Springer Nature, New York ; Heidelberg , pp. 3-23. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-2788-3_1

Cochlear implant design considerations. / Wilson, Blake S.; Dorman, Michael F.; Gifford, René H.; McAlpine, David.

Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Learning and the Brain. ed. / Nancy M. Young; Karen Iler Kirk. New York ; Heidelberg : Springer, Springer Nature, 2016. p. 3-23.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Wilson BS, Dorman MF, Gifford RH, McAlpine D. Cochlear implant design considerations. In Young NM, Kirk KI, editors, Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Learning and the Brain. New York ; Heidelberg : Springer, Springer Nature. 2016. p. 3-23 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-2788-3_1