Cognitive-behavioural theory and therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents

current status and future directions

Cynthia M. Turner*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is recognised to be much more common than once thought, and increased awareness of prevalence has been associated with an increase in clinical and research attention. However, while the cognitive behavioural model of OCD has received considerable empirical support from adult studies, there has been relatively little investigation of this model in childhood populations. Although this literature is beginning to emerge, initial evaluations suggest there may be important differences between childhood and adult OCD with regard to the cognitive, behavioural, and family factors implicated in the etiology and maintenance of the disorder. Despite this, cognitive-behavioural interventions have been largely modelled on their adult counterparts, and there has been little evaluation of the effectiveness of various treatment components. This paper therefore seeks to critically review the current status of CBT for children and adolescents with OCD, addressing both cognitive behavioural theory and therapy. Current issues in clinical practice will be identified, gaps in the knowledge base will be highlighted, and the paper will conclude by making specific recommendations regarding the integration of research and practice. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)912-938
Number of pages27
JournalClinical Psychology Review
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • cognitive-behavioural
  • anxiety
  • child
  • adolescent
  • CBT
  • THOUGHT-ACTION FUSION
  • AUTOIMMUNE NEUROPSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS
  • 7-YEAR FOLLOW-UP
  • SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER
  • INTRUSIVE THOUGHTS
  • FAMILY TREATMENT
  • DOUBLE-BLIND
  • OPEN TRIAL
  • PERCEIVED RESPONSIBILITY
  • CLINICAL-FEATURES

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