Cohort profile: the Triple B Pregnancy Cohort Study: a longitudinal study of the relationship between alcohol, tobacco and other substance use during pregnancy and the health and well-being of Australian children and families

Delyse Hutchinson*, Judy Wilson, Steve Allsop, Elizabeth Elliott, Jake Najman, Lucinda Burns, Anne Bartu, Sue Jacobs, Ingrid Honan, Clare McCormack, Larissa Rossen, Hannah Fiedler, Chiara Stone, Sarah Khor, Joanne Ryan, George J. Youssef, Craig A. Olsson, Richard P. Mattick, The Triple B Research Consortium

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Triple B Pregnancy Cohort Study investigates the effects of parental alcohol, tobacco and other substance use on infant development and family functioning. The study (also known as: Bumps, Babies and Beyond), recruited two sub-samples: (i) a general antenatal clinic sample of pregnant women and their partners (n = 1534 women; 842 of their partners); and (ii) a smaller sample of pregnant women with diagnosed substance use disorders (SUD; n = 89 women only). Participants were recruited through public antenatal clinics attached to major hospitals and area health services in New South Wales (NSW) and Western Australia (WA). Of 4068 eligible women from the general antenatal clinics, 37.7% participated, with equivalent numbers for the SUD clinics being 198, 44.9%. There were 1453 and 65 live births from the two groups, respectively, with a total of 1414 and 65 mothers in the two groups, respectively. Data were also collected on 1264 (86.9%) of 1455 eligible partners of women recruited through the general antenatal clinics. The study collected repeated measures across pregnancy (trimesters 1, 2 and 3), and at 8 weeks and 12 months postnatally; retention at 12 months was 84.0% and 73.8% for mothers in the general antenatal and specialist SUD clinics, respectively. The data collected include demographic, parental, familial and infant factors, with a focus on parental substance use and mental health, parenting practices, familial functioning and infant development. Following pregnancy awareness, 42% of women consumed alcohol, 12% smoked tobacco and 4% used illicit drugs at some stage in pregnancy. Comprehensive assessments have been conducted with infants at 12 months to test numerous developmental domains, including cognitive, motor and language skills, along with measures of social and emotional functioning. Data access enquiries can be made to the principal investigator [delyse.hutchinson@deakin.edu.au].
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-27m
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

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