Collaborative remembering: when can remembering with others be beneficial?

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

    7 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Experimental memory research has traditionally focused on the individual, and viewed social influence as a source of error or inhibition. However, in everyday life, remembering is often a social activity, and theories from philosophy and psychology predict benefits of shared remembering. In a series of studies, both experimental and more qualitative, we attempted to bridge this gap by examining the effects of collaboration on memory in a variety of situations and in a variety of groups. We discuss our results in terms of a functional view of collaborative remembering, and consider when and in what ways remembering with others might help or hinder memory.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationASCS09
    Subtitle of host publicationproceedings of the 9th Conference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science
    EditorsWayne Christensen, Elizabeth Schier, John Sutton
    Place of PublicationNorth Ryde
    PublisherMacquarie Centre for Cognitive Science
    Pages131-134
    Number of pages4
    ISBN (Print)9780646529189
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    EventConference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science (9th : 2009) - Sydney
    Duration: 30 Sep 20092 Oct 2009

    Conference

    ConferenceConference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science (9th : 2009)
    CitySydney
    Period30/09/092/10/09

    Bibliographical note

    Copyright 2009 by the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science. Publisher version archived with the permission of the Editor, ASCS09: Proceedings of the 9th Conference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science. This copy is available for individual, non-commercial use. Permission to reprint/republish this version for other uses must be obtained from the publisher.

    Keywords

    • memory
    • transactive memory
    • collaborative recall
    • cognitive psychology
    • couples

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Collaborative remembering: when can remembering with others be beneficial?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this