Collingwood and the early Paul Hirst on the forms of experience-knowledge and education

Marnie Hughes-Warrington*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Paul Hirst's 'forms of knowledge' thesis has been the subject of much discussion and debate in educational circles. Hirst's claim that such forms exist is not original but, as R. S. Peters claimed, his account is distinctive in its application to the school curriculum. This paper calls for a revision of Peters's claim on the grounds that R. G. Collingwood's writings on the forms of experience not only refer to the school curriculum, but also point up an explicitly educational agenda.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-173
Number of pages18
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Studies
Volume45
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1997

Keywords

  • Curriculum
  • Forms of experience (Collingwood)
  • Forms of knowledge (Hirst)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Collingwood and the early Paul Hirst on the forms of experience-knowledge and education'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this