Colour and luminance contrasts predict the human detection of natural stimuli in complex visual environments

Thomas E. White, Bibiana Rojas, Johanna Mappes, Petri Rautiala, Darrell J. Kemp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Much of what we know about human colour perception has come from psychophysical studies conducted in tightly-controlled laboratory settings. An enduring challenge, however, lies in extrapolating this knowledge to the noisy conditions that characterize our actual visual experience. Here we combine statistical models of visual perception with empirical data to explore how chromatic (hue/saturation) and achromatic (luminant) information underpins the detection and classification of stimuli in a complex forest environment. The data best support a simple linear model of stimulus detection as an additive function of both luminance and saturation contrast. The strength of each predictor is modest yet consistent across gross variation in viewing conditions, which accords with expectation based upon general primate psychophysics. Our findings implicate simple visual cues in the guidance of perception amidst natural noise, and highlight the potential for informing human vision via a fusion between psychophysical modelling and real-world behaviour.

LanguageEnglish
Article number20170375
Pages1-5
Number of pages5
JournalBiology Letters
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2017

Fingerprint

Color
Color Perception
Psychophysics
Visual Perception
color
Statistical Models
statistical models
Primates
Cues
Noise
Linear Models
linear models
taxonomy
Forests
psychophysics
visual perception

Keywords

  • human
  • perception
  • psychophysics
  • sensory ecology
  • vision

Cite this

White, Thomas E. ; Rojas, Bibiana ; Mappes, Johanna ; Rautiala, Petri ; Kemp, Darrell J. / Colour and luminance contrasts predict the human detection of natural stimuli in complex visual environments. In: Biology Letters. 2017 ; Vol. 13, No. 9. pp. 1-5.
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Colour and luminance contrasts predict the human detection of natural stimuli in complex visual environments. / White, Thomas E.; Rojas, Bibiana; Mappes, Johanna; Rautiala, Petri; Kemp, Darrell J.

In: Biology Letters, Vol. 13, No. 9, 20170375, 30.09.2017, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - White, Thomas E.

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AU - Kemp, Darrell J.

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