Communicative spontaneity of children with high support needs who use augmentative and alternative communication systems I

classroom spontaneity, mode, and function

Mark Carter*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present study, the communicative spontaneity of 23 children with high support needs who used Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) in a classroom setting was evaluated. In contrast to previous research, spontaneity was evaluated on a continuum rather than being treated as a binary variable. Spontaneity was found to be highly variable, but some students clearly lacked the range of spontaneity that would be associated with fully functional communication. Aided AAC systems were notably less spontaneous than signing or nonsymbolic communication. There was also evidence of systematic variation in spontaneity across pragmatic function, with instrumental functions being more spontaneous than commenting. The results of the present study highlight the need to consider spontaneity when assessing individuals who use AAC systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-154
Number of pages14
JournalAAC: Augmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2003

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